Putting In Work For The Kansas City Royals Is Old Hat For Jarrod Dyson

Putting In Work For The Kansas City Royals Is Old Hat For Jarrod Dyson

MLBbro veteran and World Series champion Jarrod Dyson has been putting in work lately. 

The Kansas City Royals outfielder has been swinging a hot stick, batting an impressive .455 with five hits and three stolen bases in his last seven games.

 

Once a party starter for the Royals, Dyson has been a valuable asset off the bench this season. The 36-year-old still can be productive on the field and at the plate and the Royals have certainly seen that this season.

One thing about Dyson is that whether he’s coming off the bench or starting, he will leave it all out on the field.

This season Dyson has appeared in 34 games and is batting .277 with 13 hits and seven runs scored. He’s not a power hitter, but he knows how to get on base and make things happen.

He also etched himself in the Royals record books. On May 20, 2021, he stole his 179th base as a Royal which put him past Frank White for fifth all-time.

 

 

Dyson may not play in as many games as he did earlier in his career but when his number is called, he makes sure he’s ready.

He had a really good ending to May, going 2-for-4 against the Minnesota Twins. 

In a recent game, on June 12, he had a solid performance at the plate going 1-for-3 with a walk and a stolen base against the Oakland Athletics.

Dyson has been around the game for a while as he’s currently in his 12th year. He’s in his second stint with the Royals and can provide a lot of knowledge and experience to the younger players.

Dyson won his first and only World Series title with the Royals back in 2015. He played an important role on that team and he’s still playing an important role now.

With an injury to Andrew Benintendi, Dyson could see a lot more action on the field going forward.

 Dyson has played with five different teams while spending most of his career with the Royals. 

During the 2016 season, he had one of his best seasons statistically. He finished the season with a .278 batting average with 83 hits, 25 RBI, and 30 stolen bases.

 

 

This brother has put up impressive numbers numerous times throughout his career and even though he’s in his mid-30s, any team would benefit from having him in the lineup. He’s that teammate you would love to play with. The energy he displays is contagious, and he impacts whether he’s in the lineup or on the bench.

 

 

As the season progresses, look for the Royals to find more ways to utilize Dyson more. 

At the end of the day, the MLBbro vet still has game.

T Eazy Has That Legends Sauce | Cleveland Should Fall Back & Let McKenzie Clap

T Eazy Has That Legends Sauce | Cleveland Should Fall Back & Let McKenzie Clap

If there’s one thing that sports can’t live without, it’s an old-fashioned Cinderella story. And if Cinderella watched baseball, she’d love Triston McKenzie. 

On Monday, McKenzie earned himself a spot in the Cleveland Indians’ history book after his eight consecutive strikeouts against the Chicago White Sox.

After fanning Jose Abreu to close out the third inning, he had consecutive strikeouts through the fourth and fifth inning before striking out Jake Lamb to start the sixth. His eight strikeouts are a franchise record. The performance surpassed Corey Kluber’s seven straight strikeouts against the White Sox in 2014. In total, McKenzie finished the night with 10 K’s. 

 

 

While the numbers are impressive, a good Cinderella story isn’t about numbers. It’s about the story behind the story. On paper, McKenzie’s numbers mean that he wasn’t supposed to come out and make history against the White Sox. While he was supposed to be a breakout star for the Indians this season, he has struggled to do so.

He carried a 5.94 ERA with a 1-3 record going into Monday’s game. Allowing walks had been his kryptonite. The former ranked prospect spent the end of May switching between the Triple-A Columbus Clippers and the Indians. After receiving a call-up in late May to replace the injured Zach Plesac, McKenzie came out strong and pitched five scoreless innings with only one hit against the Detroit Tigers. Nevertheless, he got called back down again before getting the call-up for Monday’s game.

 

 

Despite the Indians’ 8-6 loss on Monday, McKenzie displayed enough poise to gather himself after a trying second inning. He allowed four runs in the second inning before throwing strikeout after strikeout as the game progressed. 

Ultimately, McKenzie possessed a key intangible that any great pitcher needs. He was able to gather his composure, learn from his mistakes and bounce back, all over the course of one game. Those are talents he will need to reach his ultimate goal of being the next Dwight Gooden (His Dad’s favorite pitcher). 

But should that be shocking? The ability to bounce back and leave the past in the past has to be one of his strongest intangibles. His struggles this season come after his 2020 debut season when he pitched in 8 games and posted an ERA of 3.24.

Entering the current season, he was expected to be a starter for the Indians. He had even clinched an Opening Day rotation spot before things seemingly went south for the young pitcher. 

 

 

While a run in the big leagues isn’t complete without a few growing pains, what the world saw from McKenzie on Monday is that he is capable of making the proper adjustments to be an asset for the Indians. 

So now the Indians are left with a tough choice, and McKenzie’s mental strength might have to be stronger now than ever before. While McKenzie’s call-up was supposed to be temporary, maybe he is showing that he’s ready to be a major-league starter. It’s possible that the lingering idea of another call to the minors is enough to mentally prepare him for more historic major league outings. 

Jerry Hairston Jr. | Dodgers TV Analyst Grew Up With Baseball As The Family Trade

Jerry Hairston Jr. | Dodgers TV Analyst Grew Up With Baseball As The Family Trade

Jerry Hairston Jr comes from one of the most prominent baseball families ever. His grandfather, father, uncle, and brother all played in the big leagues.

After a 16-year career that included a World Series championship with the New York Yankees, Jerry joined the broadcast team for the Los Angeles Dodgers, where he has been the past eight years.

He discusses his playing career and transitioning from the field to the booth as an analyst for Spectrum Sportsnet LA in this edition of Brutha Broadcasters with David Grubb.

 

Ed Howard & Brennen Davis Are The Future Of Black Baseball In Chicago

Ed Howard & Brennen Davis Are The Future Of Black Baseball In Chicago

Ed Howard and Brennen Davis are two of the top five prospects in the Chicago Cubs farm system. 

The idea of becoming a foundational piece of a rebuild should excite any ballplayer, but for these two young MLB bros, the opportunity to do so in a Cubs uniform can add to a rich history of Black baseball on Chicago’s North Side.

Howard, the 19-year old Chicago kid who rose to fame during his historic Little League World Series run with the Jackie Robinson West program, was selected with the 16th overall pick in the 2020 draft. 

 

 

The pick was loved all over the city, and Howard seemed more than ready for the challenge of playing at home.

“I was looking forward to it,” Howard told MLB.com. “I wanted to be a hometown kid. I’m excited it’s with the Cubs. I think that’s a great organization. I watch a lot of Cubs games, follow them, know a lot of their players and things like that, so I’m excited to be a hometown guy. It’s special.”

The 6-foot-2, 185 pound Howard is projected as a plus shortstop with consistent hard contact and gap power with room to grow. The consensus top prep shortstop in his class will be given every opportunity to become a staple of the Cubs middle infield of the future.

But Howard, a smooth fielder, wouldn’t be the first MLB bro to make noise at short for the Cubs. 

Made popular by his catchphrase “Let’s play two”, Hall of Fame shortstop Ernie Banks was signed by the Cubs from the Negro League Kansas City Monarchs in 1953. Once in Chicago, Banks quickly cemented himself as the greatest power-hitting shortstop in the game.

After hitting 19 home runs his rookie season, Banks hit 44 bombs the very next year and would go on to hit 40 homers five times from 1955-60. Banks’ unprecedented power from the position wouldn’t be matched until deep into the “steroid era”.

Now for Davis, there aren’t any additional pressures of being a hometown kid, but there are still some lofty expectations being placed on the 21- year old, 2018 second-round pick. Just listen to Iowa Cubs’ manager Marty Pevey:

“I’ve never — and this is the God’s honest truth — I have never seen power like this kid’s going to have. I’m not talking about pull power. I’m talking about just raw, leverage power — like Dale Murphy driving the ball to right-center early in his career. Holy smokes, he’s got some pop.”

Murphy was a great power hitter in his era, but when you began to see “30-30 talent” on scouting reports, you have to immediately think of another former Cub. Andre Dawson flirted with the 30-30 club early in his career but didn’t become a league MVP until joining the Cubs in 1989.

In order to revive the game of baseball in the Black community, we need an influx of young, Black, exciting talent. 

 

With MLB bros like Howard and Davis in the pipeline, the future looks brighter than ever.