George Springer Is One Step Closer To His MLB Return

George Springer Is One Step Closer To His MLB Return

Tuesday night marked the return of Toronto Blue Jays high-priced outfielder George Springer. As planned, Springer played five innings out at center field and went hitless in four tries at the lead-off spot with the Triple-A Buffalo Bisons.

 

 

Against the Rochester Redwings, Springer showed signs of burst right out the gate, nearly legging out a ground ball to third for the first out of the game.

 

 

Activating the nitrous boost out the box brought a sigh of relief for both the Blue Jays execs and Springer as doubts usually loom once a player comes back from a long injury designation. 

His return marked the second time for Springer after missing the first month of the season due to right quad and oblique injuries. His first attempt happened in late April/early May, where he played in four games as the designated hitter before the Bluebirds placed their million-dollar man on the injury list.

Springer hit three times out of 15 attempts in those four games with three RBI, two bases on balls, and two home runs.

 

 

Can you imagine adding a bat of this magnitude back in the lineup for the already stacked Blue Jays, who currently have a top-three offense in baseball? They recently had eight homers in a single game vs. the Boston Red Sox, the most ever by an opposing team at Fenway Park.

 

 

Scary Hours.

When healthy, Springer is a monster. Adding him to an already stacked Toronto offense will be a game-changer. 

In his final two seasons with the Houston Astros during the 2019-2020 seasons, he combined to hit .284/376/.576 for 133 runs, 128 RBI, and 53 home runs in just 173 games.

 

 

Those numbers were the reason the 31-year-old three-time All-Star was the Blue Jays’ number one target during free agency for the former World Series MVP, who went on to sign a six-year, $150 million contract this past winter. 

 

 

Springer’s time in the minors is unknown, as the Blue Jays want to protect their prized acquisition and have him return to centerfield for their centralized location in Buffalo as soon as possible. 

Blue Jays analyst for SportsCenter Scott Mitchell tweeted a quote from manager Charlie Montoyo who said, “It could take one game, it could take five, it could take 10. We are going to communicate with him every day to see how he feels.”

 

 

Coincidentally, the destination between Triple-A Rochester, New Jersey, and Sahlen Field, where the Blue Jays play, is only a 75-minute drive, so his call to the show should be in a scintilla of a second.

Look for Springer to get back in game shape, as his Bisons take on the Redwings, including Tuesday night in a six consecutive game battle.

George Springer Is One Step Closer To His MLB Return

George Springer’s Toronto Experience Requires Patience & Persistence

If slow and steady wins the race, then George Springer looks like the surefire champion.

 In his first year with the Toronto Blue Jays, the former World Series MVP is fresh off of signing a six-year, $150-million contract. But so far he has only played in four games this season, and the Blue Jays are proceeding with caution.

The reason? A nagging right quad injury. 

If Blue Jays’ fans think it’s difficult to patiently wait for Springer’s healthy return, they aren’t alone.

Last week Springer confirmed that the process has been hard for him, too. After all, it’s not like Springer has avoided taking the field. After the quad injury kept him out for most of April, Springer came out swinging with two home runs in the Blue Jays win against the Atlanta Braves. The following day, Springer made three plate appearances against the Braves before feeling fatigued in that same right quad. Fans haven’t seen him play since.

 

 

An MRI revealed that Springer had aggravated his right quad once again. From that point on there’s been a seemingly large question mark surrounding the status of Springer.

From the outside looking in, his quad injury was never anything dramatic. Upon being removed from the May 2, game against the Braves, he did not have to be carried off of the field. He never screamed in pain. Matter of fact, the word that manager Charlie Montoyo used to describe the injury was “fatigue.” 

Despite the occasional bits and pieces from the Blue Jays’ organization regarding Springer’s injury, information on the status of Springer has been vague, and that did not change when Montoyo took the podium again last week.

 When asked about Springer’s health, Montoyo confirmed that Springer had been catching some fly balls and throwing to the bases. He proudly announced that last week had been the best that Springer had felt. In his own words, Montoyo described the update as “good news.” 

 

 

However, he remained quick to shut down any potential idea that Springer is ready to be back on the field at the moment. He described the current status of Springer’s injury as “day-to-day.” Earlier this week, Montoyo announced that Springer’s progress is continuing, and he will begin the rehab process soon.

So what can fans expect from Springer when he does finally return? Fortunately, the bits and pieces that we’ve seen from him since the injury show that he is indeed still very much capable of carrying out the fundamentals, despite his injury’s persistence. However, the fact of the matter is that with a nagging hamstring injury like his, we shouldn’t be surprised if he has a few setbacks before he is back to his normal self.

If the Blue Jays want him to be a healthy, long-term member of this team, Springer’s time spent nursing his injury should be seen as an investment above all. The last thing the organization needs is more harm done than good, especially when dealing with a three-time MLB All-Star.

George Springer Makes Toronto Blue Jays Debut | Return Of The Game’s Best Leadoff Hitter

George Springer Makes Toronto Blue Jays Debut | Return Of The Game’s Best Leadoff Hitter

The Blue Jays have been dangerous but inconsistent. That’s to be expected from a team fueled by the youthful exuberance and unlimited potential of their young second-generation MLB stars (Cavan Biggio, Bo Bichette, Vlad Guerrero Jr.).

20-something’s figuring it out along the way and doing a damn good job of it.  

At 11-12 and sitting in third place in the AL East behind the Tampa Rays and the surprising Red Sox, you can’t be mad at the Blue Jays. They are only 4 games out of first and are gaining strength with a fortified roster. 

Adding veteran Marcus Semien and George Springer in the offseason was supposed to elevate Toronto to contender status. Semien has been solid and holding down the fort as a veteran presence, but Springer was finally activated from the injured list, taking the field for the first time this season on Wednesday night against the Nationals.  

 

 

The Blue Jays lost the game 8-2 and Springer took an 0-4 collar, but his presence on the field was reason for optimism about the future. Even in a game where MLBBros Josh Bell and Josh Harrison homered for Washington and overshadowed the three-time All-Star’s Blue Jays debut. 

It was anticipated that Springer would play on Tuesday, but the Blue Jays wanted to give their $150 million man one more day to rehab the right quad strain that’s kept him out since April. 

“I want to play. I’m tired of being on the IL and not being out there with the guys,” Springer said before Wednesday’s return. 

Skipper Charlie Montoya was tired of it too.

Springer is arguably the best lead-off hitter in the game and he has championship experience as the MVP of the 2017 Houston Astros World Series win. 

 

 

He’s a five-tool baller who is just a COVID season removed from 2019 when had an MVP-caliber season and clubbed 39 homers with 96 RBI. He’s only 30 years old and Toronto paid him a nice bag to be the clubhouse presence and electrifying force that he was in Houston. 

Springer landed on the IL late in Spring Training with an oblique strain, and just as he was finishing his rehab from that injury, the three-time All-Star outfielder strained his right quad. 

The Blue Jays want Springer to be healthy for the long haul, so they were purposely cautious with his rehab process.  With underdogs like Boston elevating and favorites such as the Yankees and Tampa struggling to reach .500., Toronto believes it has a real shot at the playoffs. 

With Springer finally, in the fold, those playoff chances have elevated quite a bit. 

Marcus Semien & George Springer: Toronto Blue Jays Invested In Soul To Fill The Holes

Marcus Semien & George Springer: Toronto Blue Jays Invested In Soul To Fill The Holes

The Toronto Blue Jays’ 32-28 record last season earned the franchise its first postseason appearance in four years, and some lofty expectations for 2021. 

Adding 3x All-Star outfielder George Springer along with veteran shortstop Marcus Semien has only bolstered them. 

Semien didn’t waste any time making his impact felt, by homering on Opening Day, and then again on Monday. 

 

After seven years with the Houston Astros, a six-year, $150M contract lured Springer (2017 World Series MVP) to the AL East. Springer’s debut was delayed due to a Grade 2 oblique strain that put him on the IL to start the season, though the Jays expect him to join the lineup any day now. 

 

So the multi-tooled Soul Patroller can do more of this…

 

There aren’t too many questions about Springer’s durability. From 2016-20 he played in almost 90 percent of the Astros’ games. He’s known for being one the toughest players in the sport. 

 

He remains one of the most productive hitters in the game too. During last season’s shortened schedule, Springer finished in the American League’s top ten in home runs, runs batted in, and runs scored. 

READ MORE: Black Knights: Astros’ George Springer And The Evolution Of The Leadoff Hitter

We mentioned Toronto’s baby-booming infield, but Springer also has some outfield mates who can cause damage. He’s a seamless fit in an outfield that returns Lourdes Gurriel Jr., Teoscar Hernandez, and Randal Grichuk. The trio combined to bat .289 with 39 homers, 102 RBI, and scored 99 times. 

Springer is excited to be joining the Blue Jays young core, he and Semien will be the only players over 30 years old in the regular rotation. 

The Astros lost 92 games in Springer’s first year in the majors. Surrounded by another collection of rising stars, he was holding a World Series trophy three seasons later. 

He sees something familiar with Toronto. 

 

Brought to the Great White North on a one-year, $18 million deal, Marcus Semien has both a new team and a new position in Toronto. 

With Bo Bichette holding it down at short, Semien slides over to second base. The Jays instantly get better defensively, good news for a team that finished in the bottom third of the AL in fielding.

Semien led all American League shortstops in fielding % in 2019 (.981). Last season, his numbers took a slight dip, but the move to second provides a great opportunity for a bounce back campaign. 

The addition of Semien deepens the roster. As much as the Blue Jays may value Semien’s defensive acumen, what Toronto and its fans are really hoping that they get the 2019 Marcus Semien at the plate. 

After his best season in the bigs, Semien finished third in the voting for AL Most Valuable Player, and second in Wins Above Replacement (8.6). 

He led the Jays with three homers during Spring Training, though those accounted for one-third of his hit total. 

 

If Toronto is getting the Semien that played all 162 games for the Oakland A’s while batting .285 with 33 home runs, 92 RBI, 123 runs scored, and an .892 OPS, the Blue Jays could have one of the elite offensive middle infields in all of baseball. 

Last season was more of a struggle for the 30-year-old, some of which has to be attributed to the disjointed nature of the COVID-inflicted season. He did get better as the season went along, raising his OBP by 28 percent and his OPS by 23 percent from July to September and still finishing with a positive WAR figure. 

If Toronto is to reach its potential, Marcus Semien and George Springer should be major catalysts. 

For a Blue Jays franchise that hasn’t been to the World Series in almost 30 years, and that spent nearly $200 million in free agency, they have to be.