MLBbro On The Mend | Jazz “The Bahamian Blur” Chisolm Will Soon Return To Action

MLBbro On The Mend | Jazz “The Bahamian Blur” Chisolm Will Soon Return To Action

Miami Marlins shortstop Jazz Chisholm took live at-bats Tuesday in Jupiter, Florida, for the teams’ Triple-A affiliate. 

 

 

 

An exact timetable for Chisholm’s return is unknown, but all reports speculate that the speedster could be back from the 10-day Injury List as early as Friday when the Marlins start their homestand vs. the New York Yankees.

 

The Marlins placed Chisholm on the IL on July 19 after the shortstop suffered what looked to be a severe shoulder injury after attempting to make a miraculous play on a Bryce Harper bloop single out in rightfield during a July 18 matchup vs. the Philadelphia Phillies.

 

 

The team and the fan base should be elated by how confident Chisholm regards his injury, as all signs pointed to something more severe as he laid motionless while waiting to be attended to by the teams’ medical staff.

He told the Miami Herald about the injury, “It could have been way worse than it was, easily. The doctor said, especially if I had hit the ground a little bit harder, and that could have been it for the season.”

While taking ground balls last week, Chisholm rejoiced at how he feels like he is ready to get back out on the field as soon as the team doctors clear him to return.

Expectations are for Chisholm to continue rehabbing until July 29, during the teams’ off-day ahead of their homestead, as mentioned earlier.

 

 

Marlins manager Don Mattingly said Chisholm’s speedy recovery is encouraging, especially since he showed so much motion only days after the initial injury. 

He told the Miami Herald, “We will see what the trainers say, but him being out there is very encouraging. I know he is excited.”

Mattingly added, “he stopped by my office on the way in. It is good that he is healing quick, but I am sure we will be careful and let medical dictate when he is ready.”

Being on the injury list is nothing new for the bohemian blur who earlier in the season missed 16 games after he suffered a left hamstring strain in early May.

 

He also missed a few games in late May with a right ankle sprain and some foot discomfort in early June after taking an unavoidable pitch off his right foot.

 

 

As the team continues its search for a spark down the stretch, Mattingly told MLB.com that Chisholm could skip the recommended rehab assignments and continue taking BPs as preparation for reinstatement by July 30. 

Mattingly referenced that a few live pitches could be enough to get him back up to speed as the team is hopeful for reinstatement when he first becomes available Friday.

 

Through 263 at-bats, Chisholm will return to a .251 batting average with 38 runs scored, 34 RBI, 11 bases on balls, and 11 home runs which is a breath of fresh air for a struggling Marlins team who are last in National League East and losers of 10 out of their previous 14 games.

Listen up for the sweet sounds of the Jazzman as he should be Grazing In The Grass-like Hugh Masekela in a nightcap Friday evening against the Bronx Bombers at loanDepot park. First pitch scheduled at 7:10 p.m.

 

J.P. Crawford Continues His Rise Up The Shortstop Ranks

J.P. Crawford Continues His Rise Up The Shortstop Ranks

J.P. Crawford has evolved into a high-level player throughout the past few seasons.

When he first entered the league in 2017, it was just a matter of time until he would blow up.

When you talk about some of the top players in the league, it’s hard not to mention Crawford. 

The talented shortstop already has a Gold Glove Award under his belt and this season he had his eyes set on an All-Star selection.

 

J.P. Crawford’s Bat Is Catching Up To His Gold Glove

 

As the 2021 season progressed, Crawford was making a case for the All-Star ballot. 

This brother could not miss the ball at the plate during the month of June. He went on a six-game hitting streak earlier in the month and then not too long after went on a 12-game hitting streak.

Yes, this was all in the same month. He finished June with a .352 batting average with three home runs and 14 RBI.

 

Home Boi Highlights | J.P. Crawford

 

With those numbers you think he would be a shoe in to make the All-Star team. But unfortunately Crawford did not. The abundance of shortstop talent made him the odd man out.

Not being selected to the All-Star Game had Crawford feeling some type of way. “I was hurt. I still am,” Crawford told mlb.com when he was not selected. “I thought I had a shot to definitely be there. It’s a shame. I really wanted to represent Seattle…”

Though Crawford wasn’t selected to play in the All-Star Game, he knows that there is a lot more at stake this season.

Crawford has emerged as a leader in his third season with the Seattle Mariners. He is becoming a well-rounded, highly-confident player.

“I know I can compete with the best of them now, so I’ve just got to stay healthy,” Crawford said. 

“My first game here in ‘19, I was just trying to stay quiet, show these guys what I could do and stay out of the way,” Crawford said. “And now I feel like this is my team. And I feel that energy. Guys come up to me. I want them to come up to me. And I want to be that guy because I’ve always been that leader-type role, and I’m ready for it. This is my team. I want to lead us to the promised land.”

 

Our MLBbro is ready to help lead his team to the playoffs and he’s determined to build on the success he had during the 2020 season.

 

Through 96 games, Crawford has a .270 batting average with five home runs and 31 RBI. 

Though he didn’t make the All-Star team, Crawford is going to continue to show why he’s one of the top players in the league and he’ll be a Bro you definitely need to know during the second half of the season.

 

Barry Larkin Elevated The Shortstop Position

Barry Larkin Elevated The Shortstop Position

By Devon POV Mason | Contributor 

Barry Larkin wanted to be a shortstop ever since he was a kid watching his idol, Ozzie Smith, on television. Growing up in the Cincinnati suburbs, Larkin wanted to play for the legendary Cincinnati Reds and replace Dave Concepcion at short.

He says his dream was to replace Concepcion and then become the greatest shortstop in Reds history.

Via baseballhall.org:

“Born April 28, 1964, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Larkin was an honor student and athletic star at Cincinnati’s Moeller High School and enrolled at the University of Michigan with the idea of playing both baseball and football.

But when legendary UM football coach Bo Schembechler advised Larkin to redshirt his freshman year, Larkin’s path to Cooperstown began.”

 

After college, Larkin played on the 1984 US Olympic Team. When he got to the Reds, he eventually replaced Concepcion.

Larkin also wanted to wear No.1 to honor his idol Ozzie, but the equipment manager told Larkin the number was retired and permanently reserved for Fred Hutchinson.

Larkin had no idea who Hutchinson was, but he asked for No.11 to reinforce how much he admired and idolized “The Wizard of Ozzie”

 

Barry eventually wrestled the Gold Glove away from Ozzie, won an MVP Award, and had his number retired by the Reds also.

Of the great shortstops, Larkin possibly has the best compilation of skills: He could run as fast as teammate Eric Davis, he possessed the strongest arm among the shortstops of his generation —  and only Ozzie was better with the web.

 

 

A multi-faceted batter, Larkin concentrated on hitting for average, stealing bases and setting the table. But he was capable of going deep when the situation called for it. He stole 51 bases in 141 games, while winning the NL MVP in 1995, but for some reason was criticized for not driving in enough runs, so he came back the following season and banged all his critics in the head with 33 home run and 36 steals at the age of 32.

The Injury Bug

It’s hard to discuss Larkin without mentioning his injury-riddled history. He was placed on the disabled list fourteen times in his career. He only had 6 seasons where he didn’t spend time on the DL.

Those injuries  (legs, thumbs, knee, shoulders, and even his toe), sidelined him for 450 career games. That alone probably cost him another 450-500 hits with his batting prowess. The talent was always evident, but despite his HOF swag, and championship pedigree, he always faced criticism, and was even referred to as “Mr. Glass.”

He had to continuously prove himself and relied on a strong will to overcome setbacks.

Cooperstown Worthy 

Larkin was a 12-time All-Star, including his final season when he was still a valuable player. Despite his frequent absence from the lineup, Larkin was always a great teammate and team leader.

He was selected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2012, following a career also garnered him an  MVP (1995), World Series Title (1990), three Gold Glove Awards and nine Silver Slugger Awards.

 

 

He was simply a stud up the middle and one of the finest examples of MLBbro excellence at the shortstop position.