Taijuan Walker’s All-Star Snub Is An MLBbro Travesty!

Taijuan Walker’s All-Star Snub Is An MLBbro Travesty!

By Charles Nyonga | Contributor

 

Charlie Hustle goes First To Third and runs down the travesty that is Mets pitcher Taijuan Walker’s All-Star snub. The dude should be in Colorado because the Mets would be nowhere without their workhorse.

He’s arguably the team’s MVP, with all due respect to oft-injured Jacob Degrom.

 

 

 

 

Taylor Hearn Continues To Push The Limits Of His Pitching Potential

Taylor Hearn Continues To Push The Limits Of His Pitching Potential

Taylor Hearn is in his third season with the Texas Rangers and the left-handed pitcher has already made more appearances this season than the last two combined.

Hearn is starting to adjust in the league as a pitcher and he wants to help make an impact for the Rangers anyway he can. 

 

 

Typically, Hearn is a bullpen guy, who comes in later in the game and pitches anywhere from one to two innings. At times he may be asked to go longer.

But recently, he did something for the first time this season, starting a game on the mound.

In his first start of the season, Hearn did not have the outing that he envisioned.

On June 22, 2021, he took the mound against the Oakland Athletics. It was a quick outing for Hearn as he only threw 0.2 innings. He gave up four runs on two hits and walked three.

Now Hearn had made 22 appearances before that, but they all were out of the bullpen. So he quickly had to make an adjustment in preparation for his first start of the year.

 

He walked the first batter he faced on four straight pitches and then gave up a home run to the second batter he faced.

So you see, it was one of those nights for Hearn. But that’s the game and it happens. It’s all about how you bounce back from adversity. 

Rangers manager Chris Woodward did not waste any time pulling Hearn out of the game.

“He just didn’t have good command,” Woodward told The Dallas Morning News. “He was all over the place.”

Going into the game, Woodward was not expecting Hearn to pitch more than a few innings or even solidify himself as a starter. Hearn only made one other start during his career and that came in 2019. It was his major league debut and he only recorded one out before he was pulled.

So for Hearn, it seems like coming out of the bullpen is more of his thing. But who knows, he may get another opportunity to start during the season and he might have a totally different outing.

 

 

June has not been a good month for the 26-year-old on the mound as he finished the month with a 9.58 ERA in seven appearances.

But in May, the 26-year-old was an effective reliever out of the bullpen. He made eight appearances during the month and had one game where he allowed the opposing team to score. 

He finished May with a 1.93 ERA through 14 innings of work and picked up two wins. Hearn has a 2-2 record through 23 games and an ERA of 5.75 with 42 strikeouts. He had the streets of Arlington buzzing. 

 

#HIGH5 | Blacks In The Bullpen To Watch

 

Everyone has ups and down throughout the course of a grueling 162-game season. Our MLBbro will have many opportunities to make an impact on the mound. 

Hearn can use his recent performance as motivation going forward. There’s no question that he has the skillset to be effective.

RIP To Jim “Mudcat ” Grant |  The OG Black Ace

RIP To Jim “Mudcat ” Grant | The OG Black Ace

MLBbro.com is always celebrating the exclusive Black Ace fraternity and educating people on exactly what a Black Ace is.

Those conversations — about Black excellence in pitching and the pioneers of the game — always lead back to former Major League Baseball all-star pitcher Jim “Mudcat” Grant, who made it his business to chronicle how incredible an accomplishment it is for a Black pitcher to win 20 games.

Grant is the first African-American 20-game winner in the American League (Minnesota Twins, 1965) and the first African-American to win a World Series Game in the American League (1965). 

Mudcat passed away on Saturday at the age of 85, leaving MLB with another lost icon.

 

 

Via thewrap.com, “Grant spent seven seasons with the Cleveland Indians at the start of his pitching career, then got traded to the Minnesota twins in 1964 where he would go on to blossom into an ace pitcher the following season. Grant went 21-7 with a 3.30 ERA. Grant played for the Twins for four seasons and also played for the Oakland A’s, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Dodgers, Montreal Expos and Pittsburgh Pirates.

Grant retired in 1971 with a record of 145-119 and 54 saves.

Grant was born in 1935 in Lacoochee, Florida where he went on to become a two-sport athlete in baseball and football, at Florida A&M.”

 


What’s A Black Ace?

Mudcat is the leader of an exclusive fraternity that hasn’t had a member enter since 2012, when Price went 20-5 for the Toronto Blue Jays.

“The term “Black Aces,” derived from the book, Baseball’s Only African-American Twenty-Game Winners, written by Grant. 

The book is a historically accurate description of the lives of the thirteen African-American 20-game winners in the Majors that existed when the book was released in 2007.

 

The 15 Black Aces 

Canadian-born Ferguson Jenkins won 20-games or more a remarkable seven times (1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1974)

 

 

Bullet Bob Gibson did it five times (1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970)

 

 

Dave Stewart did it four times (1987, 1988, 1989, 1990)

Don Newcombe (1951, 1955 and 1956), and Vida Blue (1971, 1973, 1975) both won 20 or more games three times.

 

 

Dontrelle Willis (2005), CC Sabathia (2010), David Price (2012),  Al Downing (1971), Dwight Gooden (1985), Sam Jones (1959), Mike Norris (1980), J.R. Richard (1976), Earl Wilson (1967) and of course, Mudcat Grant (1965) all did it once.

 

 

Respect Dave Stewart

Dave Stewart is the last Black pitcher to post multiple 20-win seasons. To put this into perspective, in the history of Major League Baseball only five black pitchers have eclipsed the 20 wins mark multiple times in a career.

 

 

Two of the five are in the Baseball Hall of Fame: Jenkins, who won more than 250 games in a 14-year career, and Gibson, who did it five times in a span of only six years. Gibson was so unhittable in 1968, that MLB lowered the mound to make it easier for hitters to deal with such Black dominance 

Newcombe of the Brooklyn Dodgers, who was the first black pitcher to ever win 20 (1951), and Vida Blue of the Oakland Athletics during the 1970s, each reached the achievement three times.

 

 

Price and CC are the last of MLB’s Black Aces. 

Sabathia went 21-7  with the Yankees in 2010 after signing a huge free agent deal and then leading the Yankees to their first World Series in almost a decade in 2009. Price went 20-5 as the ace workhorse for the Toronto Blue Jays in 2012. 

 

 

With the way pitching philosophy and culture have changed in the past decade, we may never see another Black or Brown 20-game winner again. So we must hold all Black Aces in the highest esteem because it’s one of the rarest achievements in baseball.

We also must remember and cherish the memory of Mudcat Grant, a pioneer who endured and defeated way more than just prolific hitters, in order to secure his legacy.

We can never overlook the racism and the excruciatingly volatile circumstances that these pitchers had to perform under.

Never performing on an even playing field. Always having to be superhuman almost, just to do the simple things that their white counterparts took for granted.

Lighters, glasses, hands up in the air for a true sports icon. RIP Mudcat.

** Graphics by David Grubb

Black Aces| Jack Flaherty Has An Outside Shot To Join One Of The Rarest Fraternities In Baseball

Black Aces| Jack Flaherty Has An Outside Shot To Join One Of The Rarest Fraternities In Baseball

Through the first month and a half of the Major League Baseball season, Cardinals’ pitcher Jack Flaherty is on his way to joining one of the rarest fraternities in baseball: Black Aces.

The title of ace is given to a very select few in the game of baseball.  It comes with high expectations.  When an ace is on the mound, it is win day; period.  They stem the tide and stop losing streaks while also being able to be called on to perform in the biggest moments of the season and take down the best hitter on the planet.  

 

You Don’t Know Jack!

 

 

The Black pitcher, in general, is a rare sight to see in our game.  We see many of our MLB Bros showcase their athleticism while roaming in the outfield and even more recently have seen them anchoring defenses throughout the infield, most notably Gold Glove shortstop J.P. Crawford.

The term “Black Aces” derived from a book, “Baseball’s Only African-American Twenty Game Winners” written by former pitcher Jim “Mudcat” Grant, who was the first 20-game winner in the American League when he did it for the Minnesota Twins in 1965.  

To qualify for the fraternity of Black Aces, you must win 20 games in a season.  Looking at the current landscape of the game, there is one pitcher who looks like he will be on his way to having his own Probate this season, and it’s Flaherty.

The former 34th overall pick in the 2014 draft currently sits alone on the top of the throne for the Major League lead in wins.  His record stands undefeated at 7-0 this season with a 2.47 ERA.  He recently became the first Cardinals pitcher since Bob Gibson in 1965 to record a win in seven of his first eight games while having an ERA under three. 

 Flaherty will be compared to the late Gibson – who passed away last year at the age of 84 to cancer – throughout his entire career. 

READ MORE: The Deaths Of Bullet Bob Gibson & Base Burglar Lou Brock…

Gibson pitched for the Cardinals during his entire 17-year career and is one of the original Black Aces in the game of baseball.  He recorded five 20 win seasons during his time in St. Louis, which is second most all-time only trailing Ferguson Jenkins who had seven such seasons.

 

 

 

Flaherty is trying to be the newest member of the Black Ace fraternity since David Price joined the group in 2012.  

Recently retired future Hall of Famer C.C. Sabathia joined the group in 2010 and former pitcher Dontrelle Willis did so as well in 2005.  Before then, the feat had not been reached since 1990 when it was accomplished by Dave Stewart who remarkably completed four straight 20 win seasons from 1987-1990.

 

 

READ MORE: What Is A Black Ace? | CC Sabathia Blesses David Price With Some Brotherly Drip

Early this year, Sabathia presented Price with a custom sweatshirt and joggers.  The logo has an Ace of spade between the two C’s with a B hovering over the Ace of Spade.  

The numbers Flaherty is putting up this season have put him in the category of potential starters for the National League All-Star team in Colorado this summer, which won’t be easy in a National League that has the best pitcher in baseball – Mets’ Jacob Degrom – and the Padres’ Yu Darvish who has one of the deepest bags of pitches and the Brewers’ Brandon Woodruff whose strikeout-to-walk ratio is incredible. Hence, winning and continued quality starts will be key for Flaherty to give himself the starting nod.

After a shaky start on Opening Day, Flaherty has responded with a 1.47 ERA in his last 43 innings pitched.  He has only allowed one home run in the past seven games and has currently registered six quality starts in a row. 

 He is yet to walk more than two batters in a start this year and in his last four starts, he has at least six strikeouts.  Also this year, he joined the “Pitchers Who Rake” club when he hit his first career home run while pitching seven scoreless innings against the Rockies earlier in May.

 

 

The Black Ace Fraternity is ready to welcome Flaherty with open arms.  He is closing in on the halfway point to be allowed in the club, and there’s a possibility that he’ll break past the bouncer before seasons end.  

His next chance to start comes today as he will be on the mound in front of the St. Louis faithful taking on the Pittsburgh Pirates.  Last time he faced them, he notched a season-high nine strikeouts on May 1st.